Visualizing data with Google Maps

map-screenshot A few weeks ago, a club I’m a member of was updating its membership information. Since the data was being collected in a Google spread sheet, I thought it would be interesting to create a map visualization to show where the members come from. In this post, we’ll write a map overlay which will generate a display like the one in the following image using data drawn from a Google spread sheet. Basically, we’re going to give a map a nasty rash.

You can also see the map here, or download the files here. Note that the size of each location has been fudged and bears no relation to the values originally collected in the membership survey.

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Because we can

A few days ago, my next desk neighbour, Joe, put together a neat little Chrome extension which adds keyboard shortcuts for use in NeoGAF. It looked like fun, so I wanted to make one too, and, over the course of a smoking break, decided that it should tell me how many days are left until next St. Patrick’s day. Because hey, beer.

so_far

Version 0.1 of the plugin can be installed from its own page in the Chrome extensions repository. Enjoy!
The icons used in the plugin are from the Windows Beer Set from iconka.com.

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Revisiting the JavaScript Calendar Control – Part 3

Be the JavaScript. Check out The Little Book of JavaScript!

It’s been some time since I started writing this three part series, and it certainly took a while longer to get done than I expected. A busy work schedule does tend to do that, but if it makes anyone feel better, having left the third part hanging did give my conscience a field trip. So let’s do a quick recap and get on with it :)

  • In part 1, we created a jQuery plugin which displays a simple static calendar.
  • In part 2, we added the facility to pick a date, and to switch the month on display.
  • In part 3 (this post), we will add some sanity checks, and the ability to display events on given days.

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Revisiting the JavaScript Calendar Control – Part 2

Show your scripts who’s the boss! Check out The Little Book of JavaScript!

Following last week’s implementation of the basic shape of the calendar, this week we will add behaviours so that we can pick a date on it.

This post is part of a series of three posts:

  • In part 1 we created a jQuery plugin which displays a simple static calendar.
  • In part 2 (this post), we will add the facility to pick a date, and to switch the month on display.
  • In part 3, we will add some sanity checks, and the ability to display events on given days. Continue reading